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The transportation sector, particularly trucking, is evolving quickly. The company’s personnel are becoming older. Young people are leaving the workforce in droves. Meanwhile, as the number of businesses that depend on transportation increases, so does the need for truck drivers.

Meanwhile, trucking industry surveys recommend recruiting more women drivers who should start careers in trucking. With unemployment at record highs, equal rights movements picking up speed, and the freight and logistics industries overgrowing, now is the perfect time to get more women into trucking.

Given the current state of the trucking industry, how can a woman even get her foot in the door? Thinking about truck drivers only in terms of men creates a workforce that is skewed toward men. 

There are numerous red tapes to navigate to begin a truck driving career. This post aims to provide women thinking about a career as a truck driver with some helpful advice to get them started on the road to being successful truck drivers.

How can women give power to the trucking industry?

Across Europe and North America, the scarcity of truck drivers has become more problematic in the past decade. Truck driving has been called a “dirty man’s job” because there are so many problems and challenges that come with the job.

Since 2008, the percentage of women working as long-haul truck drivers in the United States has risen from 4.9% to 7%. Industry developments make truck driving more enticing to women. Due to a lack of drivers that have never been seen before, women are about to become the majority in the trucking business.

The study found that women made up 3.2% of the inspection sample, an increase of 23.1% over the previous decade. Women are disproportionately represented in low-paying, unpredictable occupations, while they are underrepresented in higher-paying, more stable jobs that allow them more time at home.

There is a great need for the variety and value women can provide to the transportation business. Women can move up in the trucking industry through informal networking and mentorship opportunities.

The ratio of women to men in the trucking sector is significantly low, partly due to the nature of the lifestyle that driving might entail, such as long hours on the road, time away from family, and particular safety issues.

Why is mentoring necessary for women truck drivers?

Mentoring is a kind of personal growth in which an older, more professional woman (or male) guides a younger, less experienced woman (the “mentee”). Mentors help women manage their careers, get over professional and technical obstacles, and do well in their fields.

Many women claimed they had excellent support. Over 25% of women said they didn’t have enough advice to succeed in the industry or a network to discuss professional and technical job issues.

To help women develop their careers, men should encourage, support, and mentor them. Lastly, promotional efforts highlighting accomplished women working in trucking will help get the word out about the industry’s welcoming atmosphere and the possibilities available to them there.

Some valuable tips for Women Considering a Career in Trucking

Trucking can be a successful and satisfying career option for women. Here is some trucking career advice for women:

  • Get the appropriate training and education. Most trucking employment needs CDLs, which entail training and testing. It’s crucial to find a credible CDL training school that fits the standards for your preferred trucking career.
  • Compare trucking companies to discover the appropriate one. Many trucking companies operate nationwide and provide a variety of services. It’s crucial to investigate companies that match your beliefs and aspirations.
  • Connect with mentors. Truckers, especially women, may encourage and advise one other. Trucking associations, schools, and online groups provide networking.
  • Maintain your health. Truckers must take care of themselves. Resting, eating healthily, and taking breaks are essential.
  • Maintain industry rules and best practices. Truckers must be aware of and follow industry laws to guarantee road safety.

In general, women who want to pursue a career as truck drivers should expect a demanding but ultimately satisfying profession.

Wrapping Up

Female populations seeking job retraining/reentry in the transportation industry face significant challenges due mainly to a lack of collaboration. To start a career in trucking and make a difference, education and industry must get past a few obstacles.

Truck drivers are essential to a country’s economic growth. Truck driving pays more than many non-professional, female-dominated occupations. The study stresses the path to better careers for women with family commitments.